Information of COVID-19

INFORMATIONS ABOUT GREECE DURING YOUR TRIP:

COVID-19 safety updates

  • Face masks provided for travelers
  • Hand sanitizer available to travelers and staff
  • Social distancing enforced throughout experience
  • Transportation vehicles regularly sanitized
  • Guides required to regularly wash hands
  • Regular temperature checks for staff

POST COVID-19 POLICY ON OUR VEHICLES:

Maximum of 2 passengers in a sedan car and 4 passengers in a Minivan to secure social distance between tourists. For families with children, no limitations apply. All our tours will be Private tours to secure maximum hygiene. Vehicles will be sanitiazed before every pick-up. Hand sanitizing done before departure and after every major stop during the day. Tourists should wear facemasks. Fresh trash bag will be in every vehicle and waste will be destroyed at the end of every tour.

Free of charge / complimentary face masks and hand sanitizers

  • FOOD & DRINK: 

Bottled water is widely available and prices are strictly controlled on the mainland and islands. Milk is pasteurized and dairy products are safe for consumption. Local meat, poultry, seafood, fruit and vegetables are considered safe to eat.

  • SHOPPING IN GREECE: 

Special purchases include lace, jeweler, metalwork, pottery, knitwear, rugs, leather goods, local wines and spirits, olive oil and objects made from olive tree wood. Athens is the center for luxury goods, and local handicrafts and international brand names and high street stores. The Sunday morning flea market in Monastiraki, below the Acropolis, is crowded in high season. Athens’ Central Market, a series of halls lined with colorful stalls plying fresh seafood, meat, fruit and vegetables, is also well worth a look in. Non-EU citizens can get a refund on Greek VAT (which stands at 23%) on purchases worth more than €120; the process is fairly complex, but well worth it. Ask store owners and tourist information offices for details.

  • SHOPPING HOURS: 

These vary according to the season, location and type of shop, but a rough guide follows: Mon, Wed, and Sat 0900-1430; Tues, Thurs and Fri 0900-1430 and 1730-2030. Most holiday resort shops stay open until late in the evening. In Athens, several big new shopping malls in the suburbs are open Mon-Fri 1000-2100, Sat 0900-2000.

  • NIGHTLIFE IN GREECE: 

Greece's nightlife is centred in main towns and resorts with late-night bars, dance clubs and live concerts. Athens' nightlife is among the best in Europe, with many local tavernas, particularly in the Plaka area, and ouzeris (typical Greek bars), plus a plethora of trendy bars and small clubs in the fashionable night-time districts of Psirri and Gazi playing international music.

Through summer, the Cycladic islands of Mykonos and Santorini are also noted for their exceptionally glamorous and up-market nightlife.
 For more highbrow entertainment, regular classical music concerts and international theatrical performances are held at the stunning open air second-century AD Odeon of Herodes Atticus in Athens during the Hellenic Festival (Jun-Sep).

  • CURRENCY INFORMATION:

Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents.

  • CREDIT CARDS:

American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard, Visa and other major credit cards are widely accepted (although less so in petrol stations).

  • ATM:

ATM’s are widely available in all cities and towns, on the mainland and the islands. They are generally reliable.

  • TRAVELER'S CHEQUES:

All major currencies are widely accepted and can be exchanged easily at banks. To avoid additional exchange rate charges, travellers are advised to take traveller's cheques in Euros, Pounds Sterling or US Dollars.
-    Banking hours:
Mon-Thurs 0800-1430, Fri 0800-1400. Banks on the larger islands tend to stay open in the afternoon and some during the evening to offer currency exchange facilities during the tourist season.

  • CURRENCY EXCHANGE:

Foreign currency can be exchanged at all banks, savings banks and bureaux de change. Exchange rates can fluctuate from one bank to another.
-    Weather & climate - Best time to visit:
Greece has a warm Mediterranean climate. In summer, dry hot days are often relieved by stiff evening breezes, especially in the north, on the islands and in coastal areas. Athens can be stiflingly hot, with temperatures occasionally exceeding 40C in July, so visitors should allow time to acclimatize - the evenings are generally cooler, but can remain very hot during heat waves. Winters are mild in the south but much colder in the mountainous north, where it is not uncommon to see snow and temperatures plummeting to well below zero. November to March is the rainy season, most notably on the Ionian Islands.
If you are planning a beach holiday, the sea is warm enough to swim from June through September, and hardier types will also manage in May and October.

  • REQUIRED CLOTHING:

Lightweight clothes (cotton is best) during summer months, including protection from the midday sun and sunglasses. Light sweaters are needed for evenings, especially on the islands. Waterproofs are advised for spring and autumn. Winter months can be quite cold, especially in the northern mainland, so normal winter wear will be required.

  • HEALTH:

There are no required inoculations for Greece, though it’s wise to check with your doctor before travel. The main health risks faced by visitors involve overexposure to the sun, overindulgence in food and drink, or bites and stings from insects and sea creatures.

  • COMMON HEALTH PROBLEMS:

 The main health problems experienced by visitors – including many blamed on the food – have to do with overexposure to the sun. To avoid these, cover up, wear a hat, and drink plenty of fluids to avoid any danger of sunstroke; remember that even hazy sun can burn. Tap water meets strict EU standards for safety, but high mineral content can leave a brackish taste not suited to everyone. For that reason many people prefer to stick to bottled water. Hay fever sufferers should be prepared for a pollen season earlier than in northern Europe, peaking in April and May.

  • PHOTOGRAPHY:

You can feel free to snap away pretty much anywhere in Greece, although some churches display “No photography” signs, and museums and archeological sites may require permits at least for professional photographers. The main exception is around airports or military installations (usually clearly indicated with a “No pictures” sign)

ENJOY YOUR STAY AT THE MOST BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY OF THE WORLD!

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